Salaka

SPA / Murano, Italy / 2017
Hand-blown Murano Glass Vase



The Salaka - Vase in Murano glass marks a further step in Satyendra Pakhalé’s quest to create sensorial objects. Driven by his curiosity to cultivate a design philosophy addressed to nurture our senses, evoke our memories, play with our imagination, and appeal to our sensory experience, Pakhalé realized his first piece made in hand-blown Murano glass. Using this challenging, enigmatic and sensual material he achieved an object generous in its form and complex in making – a unique result of human skills and sensibilities.





The vase is an ancient yet contemporary object that is found in nearly every culture in the world. It embodies the ‘essence of our being’. Placing a vase in a space is one of those every day acts that can lift our mood. 

The Salaka – Vase in Murano glass by Satyendra Pakhalé creates an atmosphere that does not merely fill the space but shapes it through the act of daily rituals that the object itself invites us to perform. Pakhalé has been fascinated by the vase as an object typology and over the years has created vases in bronze, steel, wood and ceramics.




‘For a while now I have been curious about Murano glass and the age old skills and sensitivities that are cultivated uniquely on this wonderful island. It is an exciting possibility to create an object using the fascinating process of hand blowing – that remained almost unchanged until today. Glass is a precious sensorial material impregnated with meaning that offers possibilities to create a delicate object almost instantaneously,’ says Satyendra Pakhalé.  




The Salaka is made of two layers of Murano glass, a fresh coloured glass outside and a white opaque inside give depth to the material. The vase with its large bowl-like base is a generous form that suggests ‘giving’. The base flows into a defined sharp edge that leads into a long neck. The vertical cut in the neck is a sensual feature that lends itself to arranging flowers in various manners - playing with its body as a frame and stage like a caress underlining the gesture of ‘giving’.